20200802_191057_edited_edited.jpg

Genetic Mutations and Traits

     On the left, we have Punnett mutations. These are normally caused by simple genetic inheritance methods and are easy to find. 

     On the right, we have Polygenic mutations. These are normally caused by complex genetic inheritance methods and are harder to study, so they generally come as an upcharge.

Known Genes and Traits

As with all species, random genetic mutations are a vital part of a species’ development on an individual level. Some genetic mutations can be traced and noticed more often in certain populations, and some cross all species. So, we are going to track some common mutations here! Please note that these are ever-evolving, as are the dragons we research! Feel free to let us know if you’ve noticed any other mutations you’d like researched and possibly added to the database.

*Please be patient with example images. We will update these as soon as possible. 

Hornless

     Individuals with no horns. Often from the None or Low aggression categories. 

     Generally recessive unless from species that hornless is a requirement for species recognition.

Hornless Example.PNG

Dual Horned

     Individuals with two sets of horns atop their head.

 

     Generally recessive unless from species that multiple defenses are common.

Dual Horn Example.jpg

Earless

     Individuals with no ear scales. This does not mean no ears, just no representing scale.

     Generally recessive.

Earless Example.jpg

Dual Earred

     Individuals with two sets of ears. 

     Generally recessive.

Dual Ear Example.PNG

Heterochromia

     Individuals with two different eye colors. 

     Note 1: This does not include if a dragon is blind in one eye or if there are two of the same colors on both eyes. 

     Note 2: A dragon with the Split mutation will always also have Heterochromia, but the opposite is not always true. 

     Generally spontaneous mutation. Heritability not yet understood. Research currently underway.

Heterochromia Example.PNG

Whiskers

     Individuals with whisker-like protrusions on the face like catfish whiskers. These usually appear in youth and are different than the whiskers koi and ancient dragons often have. 

     Multi-focal gene, still researching. Required in some species for identification.

Whiskers Example.PNG

Pinstripe

     Stripes that normally cover the dorsal and ventral surfaces create a stripe down any other line of the body. Multiple striped are normally the same color. 

Inheritance: Likely breed-specific and consistent.

     Unknown inheritance in crossbreeds. Research underway.

Pinstripe Example.jpg

Stroma

     Dragons that exhibit extra masses on their bodies. While the significance varies and is not always understood, (Some Mimic dragons use these for reproduction, some appear to be an unknown epithelial organ, etc.), it has been determined that these are living tissue and pose a function in most dragons that exhibit this gene. However, this makes determining the presence of a tumor or other unidentified lump difficult. This gene appears to erupt laterally, so if you find a strange lump on your already lumpy dragon that does not appear on the other side, please contact a professional. This also means that dragons with this gene need to be checked regularly for any unconforming masses. 

     Genetic inheritance unknown. Research will commence when a willing dragon comes forth for examination. Current theory is sex-chromosome related, similar to x-linked genes. 

Stroma Example_edited.jpg

Spiked

     Individuals with horn-like protrusions on other parts of the body, most often on the tail or wings. Often Average or higher aggression levels. 

     Multi-focal gene, still researching.

Spiked Example.jpg

Fan Tail

     Individuals that the tail fans out like a bird’s. Variations of this depend on age, subspecies, and number of allels. Often appears separate of the Finned gene, but is common with the Finned gene. 

 

     Generally Codominant.

Fan Tail Example.PNG

Clockwork

     Dragons are learning to survive in a human era. Many have started appearing with what can only be described as mimicking traits. However, the Clockwork trait seems to be more than just showing off. In most cases, the “gears” are functional, which sets them apart from the Mimic subclass. 

 

     Genetic inheritance undetermined yet. This is a very recent gene that will require a few generations to understand. Thank you for your patience.

Clockwork Example.PNG

Socks

     Western dragon specific. The ankles down are a white, faded, or rarely another color entirely. 

 

     Possibly single-gene oriented, but is more common on darkly colored dragons.

Phoenix Icon copy.jpg

Stockings

     Western dragon specific. Any part of the legs below the shoulder are white, faded, or rarely another color entirely. 

 

     Possibly single-gene oriented, but is more common on darkly colored dragons.

Phoenix Icon copy.jpg

Inked

     Individuals that get lighter/darker as the body continues (i.e. dark blue head fading to a light blue tail). 

     Note 1: Inked must occur in all colors to be considered complete inked, but incomplete forms also exist. Incomplete is almost exclusively genetic. 

     Note 2: This mutation is often linked with poor nutrition of the parent dragons when In Vivo. Unsure if nutrition variant version is heritable, i.e. genetic. 

     

     Multi-focal gene, possibly gene regulated, still researching.

Inked Example.jpg

Lucky

     Individuals that are Lucky usually have two colored scales that go back and forth in a striped pattern instead of running down the body. Usually attached to a very flashy species. May be a subspecies instead of a mutation. 

     Generally Epistatic.

Lucky Example_edited.jpg

Finned

     Individuals that trade wings for a “fin-like” shape going down either side of the body. Almost always paired with Fan Tail gene. 

     Generally Recessive.

Phoenix Icon copy.jpg

Split

     Individuals that half of the body has a completely separate color palate. 

     Note 1: Split individuals are guaranteed to also have Heterochromia. 

     Note 2: Splits with two very similar parents are sometimes difficult to distinguish. If your dragon has Heterochromia, consult with a professional to find out if also split. Bellies will often be completely washed out and are a sign of potential Split genes. 

     Note 3: Can also be a case of twins being perfectly absorbed. If entirely absorbed, dragon should be healthy. If there are incomplete head or tail “nubs”, expect health issues and high infant death rate in the wild. These dragons can survive as adults, but may need a human or another dragon to care for and aide them. This is not considered a genetic trait.

 

     Generally Recessive in certain breeds, spontaneous mutation in others. More research required.

Split Example.PNG

Multi-Tailed

     Individuals whose tail splits at any point on the tail. Can be any number of splits, as long as there are two or more full tail ends. 

     Note 1: This is sometimes caused by twins becoming partially absorbed, and is not genetic. 

     Note 2: This genetic mutation has a higher rate of infant fatality, especially in the wild. Most likely due to parent dragon recognizing it as a deformity and rejecting the child. They do well most of the time in a human household though. These dragons can survive as adults, but may need a human or another dragon to care for and aide them. 

     Note 3: Does not often come with the Multi-headed trait as well unless in the case of twins. 

     Note 4: We are currently discovering Hermaphroditic species, in which two tailed is possibly a requirement for species identification and is a dominant genetic inheritance. 

     Genetic inheritance: Unknown, research underway.

Multi Tailed Example.jpg

Multi-Headed

     Individuals with two or more fully separated heads. An ear may be fused or missing on one head, but no further down the head may be fused to be considered genetic. Can be any number of heads as long as the faces are fully separated. 

     Note 1: Some subspecies are naturally multi-headed. This is more common in Western dragons, and may continue down the neck. Chest should be singular. Look at siblings for recurrence. If there is, it is a subspecies, not a mutation. If there is any duplication on the chest, it is a case of a partially absorbed twin, which is not a mutation. Distinction between partially absorbed twins (not genetic), and actual duals is difficult. Please consult with a professional to discover the difference. Note that chests are usually larger though to accommodate two nasal pathways. 

     Note 2: Many multi-headed are usually also Multi-tailed, but this is not a guarantee. 

     Note 3: This genetic mutation has a higher rate of infant fatality, especially in the wild. Most likely due to parent dragon recognizing it as a deformity and rejecting the child. They do well most of the time in a human household though. These dragons can survive as adults, but may need a human or another dragon to care for and aide them. 

     Genetic inheritance: Unknown, research underway. Possibly gene activated In Vivo.

Phoenix Icon copy.jpg

Piebald

     Individuals with light or white spotting across their body, most often with at least one spot on the face. A least one spot has to cover over 10% of the body and at least 3 spots have to be marked to qualify. Please get a qualified professional to deem your dragon a Piebald. 

     Generally a multifocal or epistatic gene, research underway.

Phoenix Icon copy.jpg

Spotted

     Individuals with spotting across their body in any color except white, and some can include multiple colors, much like a Calico cat. A least one spot has to cover over 10% of the body and at least 3 spots have to be marked to qualify. Please get a qualified professional to deem your dragon a Spotted variant. 

 

     Generally either Multifocal or Gene Regulated. Research underway.

Phoenix Icon copy.jpg

Mosaic

     Spots or splotches of any kind too small to be categorized under Piebald or Spotted.

     Note: All Koi dragons fall under Piebald, Spotted, OR Mosaic, but are a subspecies category separate from genetic mutations.

     Believed to be a gene similar to the Agouti gene in felines. Research under way. 

Mosaic example.PNG

~

~

Phoenix Icon copy.jpg

~

~

Phoenix Icon copy.jpg

~

~

Phoenix Icon copy.jpg